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Monday Photo: UNICEF tent schools

It’s been almost two months since the devastating earthquake in Haiti. Although it seems like there’s less urgency with the news coverage on the quake, there are long-term effects of the disaster. This past weekend, the New York Times published an article commenting on how the earthquake left not only the city in ruins, but the education system as well.

>Read the full article on nytimes.com

Hundreds of teachers, and thousands of students lost their lives in the quake. Many schools and colleges have been destroyed, or are considered too dangerous to resume classes. With less schools and less facilities to properly train more teachers, the education of Haiti’s children is in “limbo”.


Children file into a UNICEF tent school, on the first day of classes in the remote village of Jacquot Merlin, above Port-au-Prince, the capital. UNICEF is also providing the children with educational supplies via a newly delivered school-in-a box kit, containing teaching and learning materials for 80 students.
© UNICEF/NYHQ2010-0200/Shehzad Noorani
Children file into a UNICEF tent school, on the first day of classes in the remote village of Jacquot Merlin, above Port-au-Prince, the capital. UNICEF is also providing the children with educational supplies via a newly delivered school-in-a box kit, containing teaching and learning materials for 80 students.

This week’s Monday photo shows children filing into a UNICEF tent school, providing much needed education support. UNICEF is also providing educational materials for students and teachers.

UNICEF is there before, during, and after an emergency. UNICEF is the lead coordinating agency for education, child protection, nutrition and WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) and is working with the Government, other UN agencies, international and local NGOs and private partners across these and other sectors.

To support UNICEF’s continued efforts in Haiti, please visit www.unicefusa.org/haitiquake.

Jenner Pascua is a production officer for unicefusa.org.

It’s been almost two months since the devastating earthquake in Haiti. Although it seems like there’s less urgency with the news coverage on the quake, there are long-term effects of the disaster. This past weekend, the New York Times took a lengthy look at how the earthquake left not only the city in ruins, but the education system as well.

Hundreds of teachers and thousands of students lost their lives in the quake. A great number of teachers-in-training are also lost. Many schools and colleges have been destroyed, or are considered too dangerous to resume classes. With fewer schools and less facilities to properly train more teachers, the education of Haiti’s children is in “limbo”.


Children file into a UNICEF tent school, on the first day of classes in the remote village of Jacquot Merlin, above Port-au-Prince, the capital. UNICEF is also providing the children with educational supplies via a newly delivered school-in-a box kit, containing teaching and learning materials for 80 students.
© UNICEF/NYHQ2010-0200/Shehzad Noorani
Children file into a UNICEF tent school, on the first day of classes in the remote village of Jacquot Merlin, above Port-au-Prince, the capital. UNICEF is also providing the children with educational supplies via a newly delivered school-in-a box kit, containing teaching and learning materials for 80 students.

This week’s Monday photo shows a UNICEF tent school, providing much needed education support. UNICEF is also providing educational materials for students and teachers.

UNICEF is there before, during, and after an emergency. UNICEF is the lead coordinating agency for education, child protection, nutrition and WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) and is working with the Government, other UN agencies, international and local NGOs and private partners across these and other sectors.

To support UNICEF’s continued efforts in Haiti, please visit www.unicefusa.org/haitiquake.

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